Category Archives: Programming

The Fridge Door is Open

My fridge door tends to rebound when closed staying open a smidgen and letting all the cold out. Rather than just checking that the door is properly shut, I thought it about time to have a microcontroller make a noise when the door has been left open too long.

This circuit uses an Arduino compatible Teensy LC for all the work, it has a phototransistor to sense the state of the fridge door light, a couple of LED’s one to indicate the power and another that comes on when the door is open. There is also Piezo buzzer to make an annoying noise after forty five seconds of door open time. The unit runs of a 3.7v rechargeable Lithium-ion battery and I have added a recharging circuit that takes power via the Teensy’s 5v USB port.

Circuitry

Note: These diagrams show 3.7v as the supply voltage. The Teensy LC can only tolerate a maximum 3.3V on the data pins, so these circuits are driven from the 3V output on the Teensy. They will all work without modification on the 5v Arduino Uno.

I have used a phototransistor to detect the fridge door light, there are two variants of this circuit light activated or dark activated, the 100k resistor can be replaced with a 100k variable if you need to adjust the sensitivity, the 330k resistor provides a weak pull-down on the output. The phototransistor is being used in switch mode to provide a logical output (rather than active mode which provides an output relative to the amount of light), so the output is connected to a digital input on the Arduino. The BC547 transistor is half of the darlington pair to provide extra gain on the output.

Dark Activated Switch
Light Activated Switch

I chose the light activated switch, either will do but will provide different logical outputs to your controller. The circuit is enclosed in a small box inside the fridge and connected by ribbon cable to the controller, the ribbon cable is flat and does not upset the magnetic ‘seal’ on the fridge door.

Component Connections

To make some noise I used a piezo buzzer from an old computer, this is driven through a transistor as the Teensy does not provide enough current to drive it directly.

Piezo buzzer

There is also a push button to provide a reset function if the buzzer is sounding while the door is open.

Push Button

I have also added two LED’s, one to show power and anther that illuminates when the door is opened.

Power and door LED’s

The final circuit if for recharging the battery, it connects to the 5V connection on the Teensy LC so charges the battery when the USB connection is in use. This has been copied from the MCP3831T datasheet.

Battery Charger

Software

This uses an interrupt to listen for the light sensor, when the state changes, the door open pin is read to determine if the door is open or not. If it is then a timer is started, this gives you forty five seconds to complete your task before the alarm sounds. With the door closed the timer is stopped and set back to zero. If the sounder goes off while you are rummaging in the fridge the reset button can be pressed, this restarts the timer from zero again.

 

Links and Sources

Extracting MP3 audio from video files

Here is a small Bash script that converts any supported ffmpeg video format; such as .MKV, .MP4 or .MOV and extracts the audio to an .MP3 file, It will also split that MP3 file into chunks and put them in a convenient directory. You will need to install ffmpeg and mp3splt for your particular platform.

Example Usage:

This uses ffmpeg to convert “big fat file.mkv” to “big fat file.mp3” and then uses mp3splt to create a directory “big fat file” containing the files 01 – big fat file.mp3, 02 – big fat file.mp3, etc. The MP3 files will be encoded at 128k Constant Bit Rate and each file will be around 50 minutes in length. To install in Debian/Ubuntu use: sudo apt-get install ffmpeg mp3splt

mp3splt can find the audio in a quiet region near where the split is desired rather than midway through a word, this should make for much cleaner playback across tracks.

Alternative Method

This script gives the same results but uses ffmpeg to split the large MP3 file and then adds track numbering metadata using id3v2. To install in Debian/Ubuntu use: sudo apt-get install ffmpeg id3v2

Creating an Audiobook

Taking this further, I was thinking that it would be nice to have these converted into the M4B Audiobook format for use on my elderly iPod. The script below assumes that you have processed the files as above and have added metadata tags using a tool like mp3tag (yes I know this is for Windows).

To complete this we need to: Combine the multiple MP3 files into one big file, or read the original big file then convert that to M4B format at 96K bit and add chapter marks every ten minutes. For this I have used ffmpeg v3.2.12 and libmp4v2 (for the mp4chaps utility), to install in Debian/Ubuntu use: sudo apt-get install libmp4v2-dev mp4v2-utils ffmpeg

This script works best from a single MP3 file rather than from those that have been re-combined back into a single file, recombining the files caused ffmpeg to exclaim “invalid packet size” and “invalid data” errors. It is able to tell the difference between a directory and a single MP3 and processes the file accordingly, don’t forget to add metadata tags and cover art before you run the script.

When encoding to the M4B using a re-combined file I saw a few of these errors from ffmpeg:

These appear to be caused by the mp3splt program from when the original MP3 file was being split into 50 minute chunks, but I can’t hear any effect on the output.

Lots of information about the file can be gotten using mediainfo, to install in Debian/Ubuntu use: sudo apt-get install mediainfo, example use:

Links and References